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Preceptor Mini-Series 1: Preceptor Pharm Tools


Written & Directed by:     
Craig D. Cox, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS
Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice
Vice Chair, Experiential Programs
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy
 
This is a 12 episode, knowledge-based, video series developed to provide educational pearls to preceptors who train pharmacy students or residents on experiential rotations. Each video episode is 5-8 minutes in length and builds upon the next. The series follows a young preceptor and two students through a 6 week clinical rotation at a hospital. The two students are polar opposites and present unique challenges to the preceptor.  At moments throughout each episode, two preceptor experts share insight on how they would deal with each learning situation.
 
Resume a Course:  To resume a course, login to your account at the top right side of the page.  Next, go to "Pending Programs/CE" in the top gray toolbar. Select the "Distance" tab and then select "A Preceptor Mini-Series:  Preceptor Pharm. Tools."
 
    
 
 
Watch the Trailer Below
 
 
 
NOTE:  This program is FREE to any State of Texas Preceptors.  For non-Texas Preceptors the cost will be $30 for the 3 hour CE program (see below). Individuals will be audited to ensure they are current State of Texas Preceptors.  Those found to have claimed FREE CPE credit for this program who are not Texas preceptors will have their CPE credits removed from their NABP eProfile.
 
Group Discounts:  If you are interested in a group rate for your organization, college/school, institution, or other entity please click here.

Fee

$30.00

CE Hours

3.00

CE Units

0.300

Activity Type

  • Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

  • Pharmacists

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
 
Texas Tech University HSC School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

Requirements for CE Credit

You will have the opportunity to obtain CE credit for each individual video episode (0.25 contact hours).  You may complete the video episodes in any order, HOWEVER, it is strongly encouraged that you do them in order (Episode 1, 2, 3, etc.) since each video episode builds upon the next.  You can complete the video episodes at your own pace.  They do not need to be all completed during one online session.  If you complete all 12 video episodes you will receive 3 contact hours of credit.  To receive credit for each individual video episode, you must view the video episode and complete the corresponding evaluation.  For any individual video episode you fail to do this in its entirety, including the reflection questions, your credit for that specific video episode will be removed from CPE eMonitor.  
 
**To Register for this Program: Select your fee type and then hit "Purchase Now" at the bottom of your screen.  If you would first like to read a description for each of the video episodes included in this course, please do so below.      

Please choose a Fee Type from the Drop Down Menu Below:
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Description
 
In this scenario, you observe two students who are about to start an inpatient rotation.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. What potential challenges do you see the preceptor facing with these students? 
  2. How could you prepare in advance to deal with these challenges?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences?
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
  1. Learn as much about your students/residents as you can before the rotation begins.  This can be through portfolios, biography forms, or other means.
  2. Don’t give up before it starts.  Things are not always as they appear.  Go into each new experience with an open mind and don’t dwell on the past.
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
Friend #1:  Brittany Patterson
Friend #2:  Joshua Miller
 
Special Thanks 
 
Texas Tech University HSC School of Pharmacy
Texas Tech University HSC Student Services
Craig & Shalyn Cox for their home
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Identify student/resident characteristics that may pose challenges during an experiential rotation.
  • Prepare a comprehensive rotation plan based on individual student/resident characteristics.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-013-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description 
 
In this scenario, you observe two students and a preceptor during their orientation session at the start of an inpatient rotation.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. What were some things the preceptor did well during the orientation? 
  2. What are some areas the preceptor could improve on for future orientations?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences?
 
Precepting Pearls
 
  1. Ask students/residents what they want to get out of the rotation.  Let them review the schedule.  Ask them their opinion on the design of the rotation. 
  2. Develop the experience TOGETHER.  This will help them to take ownership of their learning.  They should really be doing just as much talking as you are.
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
 
Special Thanks 
 
Texas Tech University Athletics for use of the Jones AT&T Stadium
Texas Tech University HSC School of Pharmacy
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Describe elements of a quality orientation that should be provided to students/residents at the start of an experiential rotation.
  • Design an orientation addressing the different learning tendencies of students/residents.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-014-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe two students and a preceptor during their first feedback session.  You also gain insight into the relationship between the pharmacy and medical students.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. What were some things the preceptor did well during the feedback session?  What could the preceptor improve on? 
  2. What impact could the relationship between the medical and pharmacy students/residents have on the rotation experience?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences?
 
Preceptor Pearls
 
  1. Prioritize constructive feedback; no more than 1-2 issues during a session, otherwise the student/resident will not remember.
  2. Feedback should occur on a frequent basis, not just at the midpoint and final.
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
Medical Student #1:  Taryn Satterwhite
Medical Student #2:  Alaric Nielson
 
Special Thanks 
 
Premiere Cinemas for their movie theater
University Medical Center
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Discuss important principles to consider while providing feedback to students/residents during an experiential rotation.
  • Identify an appropriate response to a challenging preceptor and student/resident feedback session.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-015-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe a student showing up more than 30 minutes late to rotation and you witness the impact it has on the other student.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Are you aware of the penalty (if any) that a student/resident who arrives greater than 30 minutes late to their rotation should receive based on the policy and procedure manual(s) for the schools/college(s) for which you precept?  If yes, what is the penalty?  If no, how would you handle this situation? 
  2. How would you handle the situation in this scenario to prevent the “late” student/resident from having a negative impact on the experience for the other student?  What steps should be taken?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students/residents?
 
Preceptor Pearls
 
  1. Know the school policies/procedures and go over them with the students/residents at the start of the rotation.  Be sure they are aware of the consequences and apply them as necessary.
  2. Immediate versus delayed feedback to students/residents is critical when issues arise.  Failure to provide immediate feedback will allow students/residents to take advantage of you as a preceptor.  
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
 
Special Thanks 
 
Stars & Stripes Movie Drive-In
Texas Tech University HSC School of Pharmacy 
Craig & Shalyn Cox for use of their home
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Describe the importance of providing immediate versus delayed feedback to students/residents not adhering to experiential policy and procedures.
  • Identify an appropriate response to a student/resident arriving late to an experiential rotation.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-016-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description 
 
In this scenario, you observe a feedback session between two students and their preceptor.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. What did the preceptor do well during the feedback session?  What are things that the preceptor could improve on?
  2. Please describe the “sandwich” feedback method.  Have you ever utilized this method with students or residents that you have on rotation?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students or residents?
 
Preceptor Pearls
 
  1. There are a variety of ways to give feedback.  A few examples include; “Cut to Chase” or the “Sandwich Method”.  The challenge is to know when to use them. 
  2. Recognize that different learners need to hear different words during a feedback session. 
  3. You need to take control of the feedback session, don’t let students run the show!
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
 
Special Thanks 
 
Texas Tech University HSC 
Texas Tech University School of Pharmacy
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall 

Objectives

  • Describe the impact student’s learning styles may have on their response to constructive feedback.
  • Discuss the frequency by which constructive feedback should be provided to students.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-017-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe an over confident student acting unprofessional during rounds with a health care team.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Have you ever faced a student or resident scenario like this?  How would you have handled this situation?
  2. Do you routinely use other health care professionals to help you deliver a rotation?  If so, what are potential benefits/challenges that you have experienced?  If no, what benefits/challenges do you perceive?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students and residents?
 
Preceptor Pearls
 
  1. You should brief other health care professionals that will interact with your students or residents on their role that they will have during the experience.  It should be a team effort so all parties benefit.
  2. Be sure to provide your contact information to other health professionals should an issue arise with your student or resident when you are not present.
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Physician:  Timothy Wlliams
Medical Resident:  Jessica Garza
Medical Student:  Taryn Satterwhite
 
Special Thanks
 
Whitewood Lanes Bowling Alley
University Medical Center
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Recognize how other health care professionals can contribute to success and/or failure of a rotation experience.
  • Prepare a plan to deal with a student that acts unprofessionally toward other health care providers.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-018-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe a preceptor meeting with an attending physician to discuss the unprofessional actions of her student.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Do you routinely meet with other health care professionals to discuss your student’s performance?  If so, how often and what benefit do you get out of doing this?  If no, what potential benefit do you see in doing it?
  2. Do you allow other health care professionals to assign your students assignments (in service, drug information question, etc.)?  If yes, what type of assignments?  If no, do you see the potential benefit in allowing them to do this?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students?
 
Preceptor Pearls 
 
  1. Do not let your students on their own until they are ready.  Remember their actions are a reflection of you.
  2. If an issue occurs it is better to confront it, no matter how uncomfortable it is, because if you don’t things could only get worse.
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
Physician:  Timothy Williams
Random Guy:  Thomas Boyd
 
Special Thanks
 
Body Works Gym, 4th Street location
Texas Tech University HSC 
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Describe how student performance can impact a preceptor’s relationship with other health care professionals.
  • Discuss how to prevent challenging learning situations with other health care professionals.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-019-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe a preceptor meeting with two students to provide their midpoint rotation evaluation. After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Do you routinely provide a midpoint evaluation for your students? What did this preceptor do well in providing feedback to her students? What could she have done better?
  2. What is the most challenging midpoint evaluation that you remember having? What made it challenging? How did you overcome it? If you have never had a student on rotation what is your biggest concern in regards to providing them with feedback?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students?
 
Preceptor Pearls 
 
  1. Feedback must be direct and specific.  You must recognize the stage of your learner, 3rd year (Samantha),  and  4th year (Chris).  You should have different expectations for these varying levels of learners.
  2. Set timelines to follow-up with students on recommendations provided during a feedback session.
  3. It is imperative to keep your word and follow-up with your students in a timely manner; otherwise students may not take you seriously.
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
 
Special Thanks
 
Lubbock Aero for use of an airplane
University Medical Center
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Discuss importance of providing feedback to students at the midpoint of an experiential rotation.
  • Design a feedback session based upon individual student characteristics.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-020-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe a preceptor meeting with a student as a follow-up to their midpoint evaluation discussion. After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. When you provide feedback to your students, do you give them a structured timeline by which you will follow-up with them to assess their progress? If yes, in what format do you provide this timeline to them (verbally, written, other?) If no, what benefits do you seen in doing this?
  2. Have you ever utilized a learning style inventory or personality test to help understand the way your students like to learn? If so, which ones have you used and how has it proven helpful? If no, what potential benefit do you see in knowing a student’s primary learning style/tendencies?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students?
 
Preceptor Pearls
 
  1. Show students you care and want them to do well.  Make time to meet with them and discuss their progress on your rotation along with other personal/professional goals.
  2. If they see you care, they are more apt to put in the effort and be motivated to succeed.
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
 
Special Thanks
 
Texas Tech University Athletic's Department for use of Dan Law Field
University Medical Center
Texas Tech University HSC
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Explain the importance of frequent feedback to students during an experiential rotation.
  • Prepare a plan to follow-up with students based on issues provided during a feedback session.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-021-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe two students and a preceptor reflecting on their rotation experience.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Do you spend time reflecting on your performance as a preceptor during each rotation experience?  If yes, what are a couple of things you have changed as a result of your reflection?  If no, what benefit do you see in performing a self-reflection?
  2. During a rotation experience do you find yourself focusing more on the areas a student needs to improve on, rather than on commending them for the things they are doing well?  What steps could you take to find a better balance in the types of feedback you give?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students.
 
Preceptor Pearls
 
  1. Be sure to commend students when they do things well.  Don’t just focus on the negative things.  Students need to recognize that you see both sides.
  2. Student turnarounds don’t always happen and some take time.  Be patient with yourself and your students.
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
Child:  Liam
Random Guy:  Thomas Boyd
 
Special Thanks
 
Texas Tech University Athletic's Department for use of track field
Texas Tech University HSC School of Pharmacy
Texas Tech University HSC Library
Craig & Shalyn Cox for use of their home
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Discuss the benefit of providing an appropriate balance of positive and negative feedback to students completing an experiential rotation.
  • Recognize situations when a student has made significant improvements in their performance.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-022-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe two students and a preceptor discussing their rotation experience with friends.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. What have you found to be the biggest challenge you have faced during a rotation experience with students?  If you have never precepted students, what do you perceive to be the greatest challenge?
  2. What has been your most rewarding experience as a preceptor?  What specifically made that experience so rewarding?  If you have never precepted students, what benefits do you see in being a preceptor?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students?
 
Preceptor Pearls
 
  1. Your success as a preceptor is sometimes “invisible”.  You may have to accept that you may never be told face-to-face that you have done a great job, but you have to trust that behind the scenes things are happening.
  2. Sometimes the reward is not immediate, but months or years down the road when a learner acknowledges your impact.
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
Friend #1:  Janie Robles
Friend #2:  Joshua Miller
Friend #3:  Whitney Mason
 
Special Thanks
 
Texas Tech University Mass Communications
Texas Tech University HSC
United Supermarkets, 19th Street location
University Medical Center Cafeteria
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Describe why a preceptor’s impact on student performance may not be recognized for several years following an experience.
  • Discuss importance of not giving up on students during an experiential rotation.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-023-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario, you observe a preceptor providing the final evaluation for two students at the conclusion of a rotation experience.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Do you routinely have your students perform a self-assessment prior to giving them feedback?  If yes, what benefits do you see in doing this?  If no, is this something you will consider doing in the future and if so, why?
  2. Have you ever had a rotation in which a student made a 360 degree improvement in their performance?  If so, describe the experience and what do you think contributed to this?  If no, describe a specific situation in which a student has shown some improvement in performance based on feedback you have provided them.
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with students?
 
Preceptor Pearls
 
  1. Don’t give up.  Don’t ever give up.  Your hard work can truly make a difference in a student’s career.  It may not be easy and it may not work for all students but, when it does happen, it can truly be one of the most rewarding experiences.
  2. Never stop learning, just like students you too can always get better!
 
Credits
 
Preceptor Experts:  Craig Cox, PharmD & Brian Irons, PharmD
4th Year Student:  Chris Hobart
3rd Year Student:  Samantha St. Clair
Preceptor:  Barakha Yadav, PharmD
 
Special Thanks
 
Texas Tech University Athletic's Department for use of the United Spirit Arena
Texas Tech University HSC School of Pharmacy
Reagor Dykes Auto Mall

Objectives

  • Describe the term lifelong learning.
  • Discuss the importance of lifelong learning and its impact on both student and preceptor performance.

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-024-H04-P

Release Date: Mar 25, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: Mar 25, 2020

CE Hours

0.25