Your browser does not support java script. Skip navigation
Loading, please wait  Loading, please wait...

Preceptor Mini-Series 5: Change of Heart - An Interprofessional Mini-Series


NOTE:  This Mini-Series program is currently ONLY available for Pharmacy Continuing Education (CE) credit.  CE Credit for the professions of Medicine, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech-Language-Hearing is coming soon (Available mid-October 2017).
 
Directed by:                        
Craig D. Cox, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS
Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice
Vice Chair, Experiential Programs
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy
 
Renee Bogschutz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
Director, Interprofessional Education
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
 
Disclosure / Resolution Conflict of Interest                       
It is the policy and practice of the Texas Tech Health Sciences Center Office of Continuing Medical Education to resolve all potential conflicts of interest prior to presentation.  All members of the Planning Committee for this activity have signed a disclosure stating no relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest that could create a conflict of interest. Contributing individuals:  Craig D. Cox, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS; Renee Bogschutz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP; Brian Irons, PharmD; Lamicha Hogan, RN, MSN, FNP-C ; Dawndra Meers-Sechrist, Ph.D. and Mimi Zumwalt, MD.
 
Change of Heart: An Interprofessional Mini-Series was directed by Dr. Craig Cox and Dr. Renee Bogschutz.  Dr.'s Cox and Bogschutz are employed by Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and receive a salary.  They have no other financial or nonfinancial relationships to disclose. This program will focus on the interprofessional education mini-series as developed through Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and will not include information on any other similar or related products.  
 
Produced & Edited by:    
Studio 84 Productions
 
Funding provided by:        
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Pharmacy and TTUHSC Office of Experiential Education
 
Description:
 
This is a 12 episode, knowledge-based, video series developed to educate both preceptors and students regarding their participation in experiential rotations in an Interprofessional setting. Each individual video episode is 5-10 minutes in length and builds upon the next.  The series follows multiple health professional preceptors including nurses, pharmacists, physicians, speech-language-pathologists, occupational therapists, and physical therapists as they precept their students in both a hospital and extended care setting. Through a combination of inappropriate and quality Interprofessional  interactions, attendees will learn key principles regarding orientation, feedback, teamwork, and dealing with difficult preceptors or students.  At moments throughout each episode, two preceptor and two student experts provide humorous interactions and share insight on how they would deal with each learning situation. Each individual episode ends with two important preceptor and two student pearls.
 
Overall Program Objectives:
 
  1. Introduce general concepts of interprofessional precepting on experiential rotations involving physicians, nurses, pharmacists, physical therapists, speech language-pathologists, and occupational therapists.
  2. Discuss communication, teamwork, roles and responsibilities, and values/ethics through challenging scenarios that occur in both an inpatient and outpatient settings.
  3. Reflect on challenging student-preceptor scenarios and provide feedback on how the information will impact your role as a preceptor.
  4. List characteristics of student learners that could create challenges for experiential rotations.
  5. Determine how to modify your level of supervision to match student ability.
  6. Describe the impact of timely, constructive feedback to students on clinical rotations.
  7. Discuss the importance of lifelong learning and its impact on both student and preceptor performance.
 
Course Requirements:    This online course is available for 3 hours of Continuing Education credit.  In order to receive credit, all individuals must watch all (12) individual video episodes and complete the short assessment following each episode.  After all videos have been viewed and assessments complete, a final course evaluation will be made available.  Following completion of the course evaluation, continuing education credit will be granted.  A certificate of participation will be made available to participants immediately upon completion.  For pharmacists, your credit will be immediately sent to CPE Monitor to be logged in your online account (be sure that all of your information is correct when you register).  For other professions, you will be sent a formal certificate with your profession requirements for continuing education within 30 days of completing the program.
 
 
 
Resume a Course:  To resume a course, login to your account at the top right side of the page.  Next, go to "Pending Programs/CE" in the top gray toolbar. Select the "Distance" tab and then select "Preceptor Mini-Series 5:  A Change of Heart."
 
 
Watch the Trailer Below
 
CONTINUING EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES
 
Note:  Each individual (regardless of profession) successfully completing the continuing education program will receive a certificate of completion.  You will be able to access this under "View/Print CE" credit from the main page of the website.  For individuals that require a "formal continuing education certificate" you will follow the process below, based on your health profession.
 
(1)    Pharmacy -     Your continuing education will automatically be processed through CPE monitor.  You will not be sent an additional certificate.
(2)    Speech-Language-Hearing - A formal CE certificate will be emailed to you (the email provided during registration), NO LATER than one week following completion of the activity.
(3)    Physical Therapy - A formal CE certificate will be emailed to you (the email provided during registration), NO LATER than one week following completion of the activity.  This only applies to Texas preceptors.
(4)    Occupational Therapy - A formal CE certificate will be emailed to you (the email provided during registration), NO LATER than one week following completion of the activity.
(5)    Medicine -  To acquire a formal transcript/CE certificate you must submit a request via this link:  https://www.ttuhsc.edu/medicine/continuing-medical-education/physiciantranscript.aspx
(6)    Nursing - Not all nursing disciplines will accept CME (medicine) credit, but for those that do you, you must submit a request via this link https://www.ttuhsc.edu/medicine/continuing-medical-education/physiciantranscript.aspx to acquire a formal transcript/CE certificate.
 
Please email craig.cox@ttuhsc.edu with any questions or concerns you have.
 
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
 
This course will offer for .30 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level, Related area)
 
Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (AACME)
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.  Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Designates this enduring material for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extend of their participation in the activity.  
 
Texas Physical Therapy Association (TPTA)
 
This activity has been approved by the Texas Board of Physical Therapy Examiners for (3) CCUs for PT's and PTAs.
 
Occupational Therapy
 
This activity is eligible for a maximum of 3 hours/CEU's.  Occupational therapy practitioners should claim only those hours actually spent participating in the educational program. 
 
Nursing Education
 
Many Boards of Nursing across the country allow nurses to count AMA PRA Category 1 Credits toward their licensure.  Participants should be aware of their state requirements and whether this applies to their area.  If so, this activity is available for (3) hours of AMA PRA Category 1 Credits.
 
Refund policy:  
Once the program has been purchased there will be no refunds or exchanges.  All sales are considered final.
 
Complaint policy and How to Request Accommodations:  
Any participant may submit a complaint regarding the Mini-Series program to craig.cox@ttuhsc.edu .  Any requests for special accommodations should also contact craig.cox@ttuhsc.edu for assistance.  Thank you for your interest in the program.

Fee

$30.00

CE Hours

3.00

CE Units

0.300

Activity Type

  • Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

  • Nurses
  • Other Health Care Providers
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Speech-Language Pathologists

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
 
Texas Tech University HSC School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

Please choose a Fee Type from the Drop Down Menu Below:
I am a
 

 

   

Description
In this episode you will see a medicine preceptor providing an orientation for her medical student on the first day of rotation.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. What are things the physician preceptor did well?  What could she have done better during the orientation with her medical student?
  2. List three qualities of students that could create a challenging learning environment for a preceptor.
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
  1. Do not take on a dictator leadership style as a preceptor.  It is important to engage and get to know your learner.
  2. Develop the experience TOGETHER.  This will help them to take ownership of their learning.  They should really be doing just as much talking as you are.
   
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:                Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, Pharmd
Student Experts:                   Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Medicine Preceptor:              Mimi Zumwalt, MD
Medical Student:                   Nerissa D'Silva
Medicine Preceptor's Admin Assistant:    Leslie Collins
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock)
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (Dr. Renee Bogschutz's office)
 

Objectives

  • Identify elements of a quality orientation that should be provided to students at the start of an experiential rotation.
  • List characteristics of student learners that could create challenges for experiential rotations.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a medicine preceptor and her student discussing a new patient recently admitted to the emergency room.  There will also be periodic interactions between the medicine preceptor and a nurse, pharmacist and their respective students who are also caring for the patient.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         Describe the positive interactions between different health care professionals you viewed in this scenario?
2.         What do the terms “general” and “direct” supervision mean to you?  What type of patient care activities do you think can be performed by a student             with “general” supervision and ones that require “direct” supervision.
3.         List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         Be aware of your students attention to what is going on when working in teams. If a student becomes disengaged the learning is diminished and the               potential for mistakes increases.
2.         Demonstrate how to work with other health care professionals on a team through effective role modeling.
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:            Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:               Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Medicine Preceptor:          Mimi Zumwalt, MD
Medical Student:               Nerissa D'Silva
Pharmacy Preceptor:         Michelle Babb-Tarbox, MD
Pharmacy Student:            Britni Montague
Nurse Preceptor:               Irene Salinas, DNP, RN
Patient:                            Bill Woodard
Emergency Room Extras:   Renee J. Bogschutz, PhD, CCC-SLP, Craig D. Cox, PharmD, Ryan (Studio 84)
Spirit Ranch Extras:           Jim Shearer and Morgan
 
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock)
University Medical Center (Emergency Department)

Objectives

  • Recognize the importance of demonstrating respect to other health care professionals.
  • Discuss the necessity of proper supervision and communication with students.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see heated interactions between a nurse, physician, pharmacist and their respective students as they debate the most appropriate care for a patient recently admitted to the emergency room.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         What feedback would you provide the nurse preceptor in this episode regarding her communicating skills with her student?
2.         What impact could the conflict between health care professionals at the bedside of the patient have on their care?  Have you ever experienced a                  similar situation?  If so, please describe and how you dealt with it.
3.         List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         Model skills to your students on how to effectively communicate with patients and other healthcare team members. 
2.         Determine level of delegation of patient care that is safe and appropriate.  Recognize, assess, and address issues in professionalism among             healthcare team members. 
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:                Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:                   Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Nurse Preceptor:                   Irene Salinas, DNP, RN
Nurse Student:                      Jessica Schuck
Patient:                                Bill Woodard
Family Member:                    Beth Petersen
Medicine Preceptor:              Mimi Zumwalt, MD
Medical Student:                   Nerissa D'Silva
Pharmacy Preceptor:             Michelle Babb-Tarbox, MD
Pharmacy Student:                Britni Montague
Spirit Ranch Extras:               Jim Shearer and Morgan
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, TX)
University Medical Center (Emergency Department)

Objectives

  • Explain the importance of serving as a role model for students
  • Recognize how the lack the of professionalism can impact interprofessional team members

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a physician, nurse, pharmacist, and their respective students discussing a medication error that occurred earlier in the day.  Each professional will be taken some accountability for what had occurred.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions (see preceptor reflection questions below):
 
1.         Briefly describe a mistake you have made in your professional career?  Did you take accountability for your actions?  If so, what was the most                         difficult component of the situation?
2.         Describe a situation when you had a conflict with another health care professional.  How did you resolve that difficult situation? 
3.         List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         It is important to demonstrate to students how to take accountability for your actions.  Not only for your successes but also your mistakes.
2.         Learning to resolve conflict without blaming others for mistakes can be vital to a student’s  education. Hopefully catastrophic events do not occur             but if they do, they can be an invaluable tool in teaching conflict resolution.
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:                Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:                   Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschile
Medicine Preceptor:              Mimi Zumwalt, MD
Medicine Student:                 Nerissa D'Silva
Pharmacy Preceptor:             Michelle Babb-Tarbox, MD
Pharmacy Student:                Britni Montague
Nurse Preceptor:                   Irene Salinas, DNP, RN
Nursing Student:                   Jessica Schuck
 
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, TX)
University Medical Center (Medical Intensive Care Unit)

Objectives

  • Describe to students the importance of taking responsibility for their actions
  • Demonstrate to students proper ways to both problem solve and resolve conflict

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a medical student discussing a patient who is scheduled for transfer from an inpatient hospital to outpatient skilled nursing facility.  Participating in the discussion is a physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech / language and pathologist and the their students.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         Is there an activity and/or technique you use with your students to engage them with other health care professionals?
2.         Do you regularly ask other health care professionals for feedback if they help supervise your students/residents when you are not around?  If so, how             do they provide you with their feedback?  If no, is this something you would consider doing?
3.         List one thing you leaned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         Prepare student learners for interprofessional team conferences.  Provide a ‘space at the table’ for learners from all professions to present in a safe             team-based environment.
2.         Encourage students to work with individuals from other professions.  When appropriate, utilize other health care professionals to assess your             student’s performance.
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:            Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:               Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Medical Student:               Nerissa D'Silva
Pharmacy Student:            Britni Montague
PT Preceptor:                    Kate Panasci, DPT, PT, CBIS, CWS
PT Student:                       Anje Mari Juan
OT Preceptor:                   Beverly Reed
OT Student:                      Jordan McIntyre
SLP Preceptor:                  Brittany Hall, M.S., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
SLP Student:                     Sara Eaton
Social Worker:                   Linda C. Nwachukwu, PharmD, MPH
Unit Nurse:                       Anastasia Knuckles
 
*Note:  PT = Physical Therapy, OT = Occupational Therapy, and SLP = Speech, Language and Pathology
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, TX)
University Medical Center (5th Floor)

Objectives

  • Show students how to engage other healthcare professionals to expand their knowledge to enhance their delivery of patient care.
  • Utilize other healthcare team members to assist you in identifying a student’s ability to participate in interprofessional activities.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a speech language pathologist and her student working with a patient to monitor his eating / swallowing capabilities.  Later in the episode a crisis will occur, requiring quick collaboration between the speech language pathologist and occupational therapist.  The will successfully resolve the situation.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         How would you have handled the student in this episode when she started using the “big words” with the patient? 
2.         How do you know when a student needs your “direct” supervision (side by side) vs. “general” supervision (student working more independently)?                   What student characteristics do you look for to help you determine this?
3.         List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         Include students in all aspects of patient care including interprofessional team collaboration.
2.         Modify levels of supervision commiserate with student ability.  Begin with direct supervisor until student demonstrates ability for greater                             independence.
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:            Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:               Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Patient:                            Bill Woodard
SLP Preceptor:                  Carolyn Perry, MS, CCC-SLP
SLP Student:                     Monica A. Stahl
OT Preceptor:                   Sandra Whisner, PhD
 
*Note:  SLP = Speech, Language and Pathology and OT = Occupational Therapy
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, TX)
Crown Point
 

Objectives

  • Identify appropriate communication strategies to use with your students when providing patient care.
  • Determine how to modify your level of supervision to match student ability.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a physical therapist and his student working with a patient on a rehabilitation exercise.   A brief interaction between them and the patient’s physician and student will also be seen.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         What did the preceptor do well in giving feedback to the student in this episode?  What are things the preceptor could improve on?
2.         Describe your most challenging feedback session?  What made it challenging?  How did you overcome it?  If you have never had a student on                     rotation, what is your biggest concern in regards to providing feedback?
3.         List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         Sometimes as a preceptor, you must be willing to put your student in the spotlight.  However, don’t abandon them to the pressure.  Allow them to               struggle but be there to provide feedback as necessary.
2.         Be open to the possibility your student will identify something you overlooked.  When this happens, provide encouragement to your them rather             than getting defensive.  This can help to build their confidence.  
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:                Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:                   Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Patient:                                Bill Woodard
Medicine Preceptor:              Mimi Zumwalt, MD
Medicine Student:                 Nerissa D'Silva, MD
PT Preceptor:                       Ravi Rajmohan
PT Student:                          Alex Ann Miller
 
*Note:  PT = Physical Therapy
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, TX)
Crown Point
 

Objectives

  • Identify ways in which feedback can be provided to students during interactions with patients or colleagues to avoid diminishing others’ trust in the student.
  • Discuss the importance of providing students immediate feedback of their performance.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see an occupational therapist and her student working with a patient who is learning how to tie their shoes.  Immediately following this interaction, you will see discussion between a field work administrator and preceptor regarding the performance of the occupational therapy student.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         Have you ever used a learning contract, or something similar, with your students during your rotations?  If yes, what benefits has it had?  If you             never have used one, what benefits can you see to using a learning contract?
2.         Do you know who to contact at the school of pharmacy if an issue arises with a student?    Describe a situation where you needed to seek help when             dealing with a student issue?  If you have never sought help, who would you contact to deal with a student issue
3.         List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
  1.       Use clear, written learning objectives in the form of a learning contract with a student who is not meeting performance expectations.
  2.       Communicate regularly with your student and when necessary with their professional academic program administrators. 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:            Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:               Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Patient:                            Bill Woodard
OT Preceptor:                   Sandra Whisner, PhD
OT Student:                      Elizabeth Reyna
OT Co-worker:                  Laurie Stelter, OTR, MA
OT Academic Field Coordinator:    Dawndra Meers Sechrist, OTR, PhD
PT Student:                      Alex Ann Miller
 
*Note:  OT = Occupational Therapy, PT = Physical Therapy
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, TX)
Crown Point
 

Objectives

  • Recognize the importance of using clear, written learning objectives in the form of a learning contract with a student who is not meeting performance expectations.
  • Identify a process for communicating with a struggling student and his/her academic program.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a group of six different health care professionals and their students discussing the care of a patient with their family.  In this meeting tough decisions are being made and emotions run high.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions (see preceptor reflection questions below):
 
1.         Provide an example of a situation when you have “modeled” skills for your students and/or residents.  If you have not yet had students, what does             the process of “modeling” skills mean to you?
2.         In this episode, students were faced with a very difficult family situation that appeared to make some of them uncomfortable.  Describe a similar             situation you have faced during your experiences as a preceptor and how you handled it with your students.  If you have not yet been a preceptor,             how would you have approached the situation in this episode with your students?
3.         List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         There are moments on a rotation where preceptors need to model behaviors for their students.  This is especially critical in difficult situations or             when a student is experiencing something for the first time. 
2.         When students experience uncomfortable situations it is important preceptors take time to debrief with them to assess how they feel and determine             what they learned. 
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:            Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:               Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Nurse Manager:                 Angela Van Sickle-Bednarz, PhD, CCC-SLP
Medicine Preceptor:          Mimi Zumwalt, MD
Medical Student:               Nerissa D'Silva
Pharmacy Preceptor:        James Tarbox, MD
Pharmacy Student:            Kweku Benning
SLP Preceptor:                  Carolyn Perry, MS, CCC-SLP
SLP Student:                     Monica A. Stahl
OT Preceptor:                   Sandra Whisner, PhD
OT Student:                      Elizabeth Reyna
PT Preceptor:                   Ravi Rajmohan
PT Student:                      Alex Ann Miller
Family Member:                Beth Petersen
 
*Note:  SLP = Speech, Language, and Pathology, OT = Occupational Therapy, PT = Physical Therapy
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, TX)
Crown Point

Objectives

  • Illustrate appropriate preceptor modeling skills to utilize with students when faced with challenging learning situations.
  • Recognize the significance of debriefing with your students following each learning experience.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a nursing preceptor and her student discussing wound care for a patient in a skilled nursing facility.   After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         In this episode, the nursing student was seeking out some independence in completing a rotation activity.  What do you feel the preceptor did well             in responding to the student’s request?  What could she have done better?
2.         Do you make student self-assessment a regular part of your student feedback process?  If yes, what benefits do you see in doing this?  If no, than             why have you not routinely done this and will you know consider?
3.         List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         As a rotation progress, encourage students to seek increased independence in the clinical setting.  
2.         Provide timely, constructive feedback to guide students’ clinical reasoning. 
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Expert:            Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Expert:               Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Nurse Preceptor:             Rebecca (Becky) Martin-Geist, MSN, RN, APHN-BC
Nursing Student:              Zhen Zhang
Family Member:              Beth Petersen
Patient:                          Bill Woodard
PT Student:                    Alex Ann Miller
Unit Secretary:               Nephy Samuel, PharmD
 
*Note:  PT = Physical Therapy
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, TX)
Crown Point

Objectives

  • Discuss process for encouraging students to seek increased independence in the clinical setting.
  • Describe the impact of timely, constructive feedback to students on clinical rotations.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a group of health care professionals and their students meeting (both formally and informally) to discuss unfortunate mistakes that occurred that most likely contributed to the death of a patient.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         In this episode you see multiple health professionals and their students discussing a difficult situation involving a patient who had passed away,              most likely from one or more medical errors. What do you think the preceptors did well in this episode to comfort their students?  What could they             have done better?
2.         Have you made a mistake as a health care professional?  If so, how did you handle that situation?  Do you ever use this as an example for your             students to learn from – if not, is this something you might consider doing?
3.         List one thing that you learned during this program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.         Implement effective guidance and management of ethical dilemmas.  Encourage respectful and clear communication between inter-professional                   healthcare team.
2.         Teach students the importance of being accountable for their actions regardless of the positive or negative impact they have had on the patient                   treatments and outcomes. 
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:              Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Experts:                 Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD and John Haunschild
Nurse Manager:                   Angela Van Sickle-Bednarz, PhD, CCC-SLP
Medicine Preceptor:            Mimi Zumwalt, MD
Medicine Student:               Nerissa D'Silva
Pharmacy Preceptor:          James Tarbox, MD
Pharmacy Student:              Kweku Benning
Nurse Preceptor:                 Rebecca (Becky) Martin-Geist, MSN, RN, APHN-BC
Nursing Student:                  Zhen Zhang
SLP Preceptor:                    Carolyn Perry, MS, CCC-SLP
SLP Student:                        Monica A. Stahl
OT Preceptor:                     Sandra Whisner, PhD
OT Student:                        Elizabeth Reyna
PT Preceptor:                     Ravi Rajmohan
PT Student:                        Alex Ann Miller
 
*Note:  SLP = Speech, Language, and Pathology, OT = Occupational Therapy, PT = Physical Therapy
 
Special Thanks 
 
Spirit Ranch (Lubbock, Texas)
Crown Point

Objectives

  • Explain process for effectively guiding and managing ethical dilemmas with students in an interprofessional patient care situation.
  • Recognize the importance of taking accountability for your actions and the impact it can have on interprofessional team dynamics.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

Description
 
In this episode you will see a group of several health profession students reflecting on their recent rotation and their role in the care of the patient who had recently passed away.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.         What has been your most rewarding experience as a preceptor?  What specifically made that experience so rewarding?  If you have never served as a             preceptor for a student, what do perceive are the greatest benefits?
2.         Do you spend time reflecting on your performance as a preceptor during each rotation experience?  If yes, what are a couple of things that have             changes as a result of your reflection?  If no, what potential benefits do you seen in performing self reflection?
3.         List one thing that you learned that you plan on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
 
Precepting Pearls 
1.    Your success as a preceptor is sometimes “invisible”.  You may have to accept that you may never be told face-to-face that you have done a great job,          but you have to trust that your experience has positively impacted your students.
2.    Sometimes the reward is not immediate, but months or years down the road when a learner acknowledges your impact.
 
Credits 
 
Preceptor Experts:            Craig D. Cox, PharmD and Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Student Expert:                Amanda I. Rodriguez, AuD
TTUHSC President:            Dr. Tedd L. Mitchell, MD
Announcer at Race:           Anastasia Knuckles
Family Member:                Beth Petersen
Medical Student:               Nerissa D'Silva
PT Student:                       Alex Ann Miller
OT Student:                      Elizabeth Reyna
SLP Student:                     Monica A. Stahl
SLP Preceptor:                  Carolyn Perry, MS, CCC-SLP
Pharmacy Student:            Britni Montague
5K Race Extras:                 Heather Carr, MS, CCC-SLP, Nicholas Perry, Elliot Pitchford, Lauren Keller
 
 
Special Thanks 
 
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Objectives

  • Describe why a preceptor’s impact on student performance may not be recognized for several years following an experience.
  • Discuss the importance of lifelong learning and its impact on both student and preceptor performance.

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

   

   

This is the final evaluation for Mini-Series 5:  A Change of Heart.  Once you have successfully completed this evaluation you will receive 3 hours of continuing education credit that will be automatically sent to your CPE Monitor Account.  
 
Thank you for completing the Mini-Series!

Activity Number

0096-0000-17-033-H04-P

Release Date: May 1, 2017
Credit Expiration Date: May 1, 2020

CE Hours

3.00