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Preceptor Mini-Series 3: Residency Preceptor's Experience


Written & Directed by:     
Craig D. Cox, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS
Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice
Vice Chair, Experiential Programs
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy
 
 
This 6-episode Series follows a pharmacy resident and preceptor during a clinical rotation at a hospital.  Each video episode is 5-8 minutes in length and builds upon the next.   During the Series you will view interactions between the resident, preceptor, residency director, and health-care team as they progress through the clinical rotation.  At moments throughout each episode, two preceptor experts provide humorous interactions and share insight on how they would deal with each learning situation.  The experts will discuss principles focused on residency accreditation standards, the four major preceptor roles (direct instruction, modeling, coaching, and facilitation), and the concept of continuous residency program improvement. 
 
Overall Course Objectives
 
1. Describe the importance of getting to know your students and/or residents on an experiential rotation.
2. Briefly discuss ways to introduce the concept of Interprofessionalism during an orientation for an experiential
rotation.
3. Explain the importance of values and ethics to an Interprofessional relationship.
4. Discuss the importance of good communication skills for creating a positive Interprofessional environment.
5. Recognize the importance of knowing the roles and responsibilities of other health care professionals.
6. Discuss the concept of teamwork and the role it has in an Interprofessional environment.
7. Determine the appropriate level of supervision you should provide for your student and/or resident during an
experiential rotation.
8. Discuss the role of reflection in the creation of a successful Inteprofessional teaching environment.
 
Resume a Course:  To resume a course, login to your account at the top right side of the page.  Next, go to "Pending Programs/CE" in the top gray toolbar. Select the "Distance" tab and then select "A Preceptor Mini-Series 3:  A Resident Preceptor's Experience:  It's Not as Easy as it Looks".
 
 
Watch the Trailer Below
 
 
 
Registration Fee:  This program is FREE to Texas Tech Health Sciences Center Preceptors.  For other state of Texas Preceptors the cost is $12 and for non-Texas Preceptors the cost is $15 for the 1.5 hour CE program (see below). Individuals will be audited to ensure they selected the correct enrollment type.  Those found to have falsely selected the wrong enrollment type for the lesser registration fee risk having their CPE credits removed from their NABP eProfile.
 
Course Requirements:    This online course is available for 3.0 hours of Continuing Education credit.  In order to receive credit, all individuals must watch all (12) individual video episodes and complete the short assessment following each episode.  After all videos have been viewed and assessments complete, a final course evaluation will be made available. Following completion of the course evaluation, continuing education credit will be granted.  
 
Group Discounts:  If you are interested in a group rate for your organization, college/school, institution, or other entity please click here.

Fee

$15.00

CE Hours

1.50

CE Units

0.150

Activity Type

  • Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

  • Pharmacists

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
 
Texas Tech University HSC School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

Requirements for CE Credit

You will have the opportunity to obtain CE credit for each individual video episode (0.25 contact hours).  You may complete the video episodes in any order, HOWEVER, it is strongly encouraged that you do them in order (Episode 1, 2, 3, etc.) since each video episode builds upon the next.  You can complete the video episodes at your own pace.  Once you complete all 6 video episodes you will receive 1.5 contact hours of credit.  To receive credit for each individual video episode, you must view the video episode and complete the corresponding evaluation with reflection questions.  
 
For any individual video episode you fail to complete in its entirety, including the reflection questions, your credit for that specific video episode will be removed from CPE eMonitor.  
 
To Register for this Program: Select your fee type and then hit "Purchase Now" at the bottom of your screen.  If you would first like to read a description for each of the video episodes included in this course, please do so below.  

Please choose a Fee Type from the Drop Down Menu Below:
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Description
 
In this scenario you observe a pharmacy residency director and preceptor discussing a last-minute change to a resident rotation.  After you view this episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. List as many residency preceptor qualifications (per accreditation guidelines) that you can remember. 
  2. Describe a situation you have faced as a residency preceptor similar to the last-minute request portrayed in this scenario. How did you handle? What would you have done differently?  If you haven't experienced this, what would be an appropriate approach to deal with such a situation?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with residents?
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
  1. Residency preceptors must have training and expertise in the area of practice in which the supervise residents.
  2. It is important to know what the accreditation standards say, but even more important to follow them.
 
Credits 
 
Residency Program Director:  Charles F. Seifert, PharmD
Residency Preceptor:  Rebecca B. Sleeper-Irons, PharmD
Student Extra #1:  Brant Wilson, PharmD Candidate
Student Extra #2:  Thoaichau “Tina” Truong, PharmD Candidate
Preceptor Expert #1:  Craig D. Cox, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #2:  Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Butler:  Joshua Miller
 
Special Thanks 
 
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Brian and Rebecca Irons for use of their home

Objectives

  • Identify the qualifications of a residency preceptor as defined by the accreditation guidelines.
  • Discuss alternative approaches to address unforeseen, last minute changes to a residency rotation.

Activity Number

0096-0000-15-061-H04-P

Release Date: Jun 12, 2015
Credit Expiration Date: Jun 12, 2018

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario you observe a resident preceptor and her pharmacy resident during an orientation.  After you view the episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. What were some things the resident preceptor did well during the orientation?
  2. What were some areas the resident preceptor could improve on for future orientations?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences.
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
  1. Ask your residents what they want to get out of the rotation and then tailor the experience to meet their needs.  
  2. No resident and no rotation is ever the same.  Be flexible in your rotation planning to address the differences of learners.
 
Credits 
 
Residency Preceptor:  Rebecca B. Sleeper-Irons, PharmD
Pharmacy Resident:  Aaron Thompson, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #1:  Craig D. Cox, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #2:  Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Butler:  Joshua Miller
 
Special Thanks 
 
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy
Brian and Rebecca Irons for use of their home

Objectives

  • Recognize the importance of getting to know your learner at the start of a rotation.
  • Describe the importance of reviewing resident and preceptor expectations during the rotation orientation.

Activity Number

0096-0000-15-062-H04-P

Release Date: Jun 12, 2015
Credit Expiration Date: Jun 12, 2018

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario you observe a resident and their preceptor interacting with other health care professionals on the general medicine floor of the hospital.  The preceptor roles of direct instruction and modeling are introduced.  After you view the episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Provide an example of a situation when you have utilized the role of “direct instruction” with your resident.  What did you find the most challenging with this role?
  2. Provide an example of a situation when you have utilized the role of “modeling” with your resident.   What did you find the most challenging with this role?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with residents?
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.        Direct instruction is one of the fundamental preceptor roles.  It involves asking the resident to research a topic and report back to the preceptor.                      Lecturing to residents should be minimized.  
2.        Modeling is another key preceptor role.  It involves the resident observing the preceptor thinking out loud as they complete a task. 
 
Credits 
 
Residency Preceptor:  Rebecca B. Sleeper-Irons, PharmD
Pharmacy Resident:  Aaron Thompson, PharmD
Medical Resident:  Joshua Raygosa, PharmD
Physician:  Mimi Zumwalt, MD
Medical Student:  Jason Serna, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #1:  Craig D. Cox, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #2:  Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Butler:  Joshua Miller
 
Special Thanks 
 
University Medical Center
Brian and Rebecca Irons for use of their home

Objectives

  • Define the preceptor roles of direct instruction and modeling.
  • Identify the learning situations where the roles of direct instruction and modeling are most appropriate.

Activity Number

0096-0000-15-063-H04-P

Release Date: Jun 12, 2015
Credit Expiration Date: Jun 12, 2018

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario you observe the pharmacy resident and his preceptor discussing patients at the hospital.  The preceptor roles of coaching and facilitation are introduced.  After you view the episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Provide an example of a situation when you have utilized the role of “coaching” with your resident. What did you find the most challenging with this role?
  2. Provide an example of a situation when you have utilized the role of “facilitation” with your resident.  What did you find the most challenging with this role?
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with residents?
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.    Coaching is a key preceptor role.  It involves the preceptor observing a resident perform a task while providing feedback throughout the process.
2.    Facilitating is the final preceptor role.  This role asks the resident to complete activities independently and then debrief with the preceptor to discuss the        experience.  
 
Credits 
 
Residency Preceptor:  Rebecca B. Sleeper-Irons, PharmD
Pharmacy Resident:  Aaron Thompson, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #1:  Craig D. Cox, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #2:  Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Butler:  Joshua Miller
 
Special Thanks 
 
University Medical Center
Brian and Rebecca Irons for use of their home

Objectives

  • Define the preceptor roles of coaching and facilitation.
  • Identify the learning situations where the roles of coaching and facilitation are appropriate.

Activity Number

0096-0000-15-064-H04-P

Release Date: Jun 12, 2015
Credit Expiration Date: Jun 12, 2018

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario you observe the pharmacy resident and preceptor discussing his final evaluation for the rotation.  After you view the episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
  1. Do you routinely provide feedback to your residents?  What did this preceptor do well in providing feedback to her resident? What could she have done better?
  2. Provide an example of a situation where you provided both quality “written” and “verbal” feedback to a resident.  Describe the impact this had on their future performance.
  3. List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with residents?
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.    It is critical to require the resident to complete a self-assessment of their performance.  It is equally important for the preceptor to take time to review            and discuss it with them.
2.    Both verbal AND written feedback should be provided to the resident throughout a rotation.  Feedback should be specific and address quality not just                quantity of activities. 
 
Credits 
 
Residency Preceptor:  Rebecca B. Sleeper-Irons, PharmD
Pharmacy Resident:  Aaron Thompson, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #1:  Craig D. Cox, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #2:  Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Butler:  Joshua Miller
 
Special Thanks 
 
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy
Brian and Rebecca Irons for use of their home

Objectives

  • Design an appropriate feedback session based upon individual resident characteristics.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the importance of providing BOTH verbal and written feedback to a resident during a rotation experience.

Activity Number

0096-0000-15-065-H04-P

Release Date: Jun 12, 2015
Credit Expiration Date: Jun 12, 2018

CE Hours

0.25
   

   

Description
 
In this scenario you observe two pharmacy residents discussing their residency.  This is followed by a short interaction between the residency preceptor and residency program director reflecting on the last rotation experience.  After you view the episode you will be asked to spend a few minutes reflecting on the following questions:
 
1.     Provide an example of a rotation where utilizing information from a resident’s past rotations had a positive impact on their current experience.
2.     Do you spend time “reflecting” at the conclusion of each rotation?  If so, do you find this helpful and why?  If not, what is the biggest barrier                     preventing you from doing this?
3.     List one thing you learned during the program that you intend on incorporating into your rotation experiences with residents?
 
Precepting Pearls 
 
1.        Preceptors should consider resident’s prior experiences when designing a rotation.  Resident performance should not only be measured on an individual            rotation but longitudinally throughout the year.
2.        Preceptors must take time to reflect.  Take time to think about each experience and what went well and can be improved for next time.  Just like                  their residents, preceptors should never stop learning.
 
Credits 
 
Residency Preceptor:  Rebecca B. Sleeper-Irons, PharmD
Pharmacy Resident #1:  Aaron Thompson, PharmD
Pharmacy Resident #2:  Nephy Samuel, PharmD
Residency Program Director:  Charles F. Seifert, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #1:  Craig D. Cox, PharmD
Preceptor Expert #2:  Brian K. Irons, PharmD
Butler:  Joshua Miller
 
Special Thanks 
 
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Brian and Rebecca Irons for use of their home

Objectives

  • Discuss the importance of utilizing performance metrics/feedback from prior rotations to enhance the resident’s experience for future rotations.
  • Describe how the process of reflection can be used to assure the concept of continuous residency program improvement is successfully achieved.

Activity Number

0096-0000-15-066-H04-P

Release Date: Jun 12, 2015
Credit Expiration Date: Jun 12, 2018

CE Hours

0.25